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Annie Maria Hansen

Annie Maria Hansen[1, 2]

Female 1840 - 1920  (79 years)  Submit Photo / DocumentSubmit Photo / Document

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  • Name Annie Maria Hansen  [3
    Born 19 Nov 1840  Egtved, , Vejle Amt, Denmark Find all individuals with events at this location  [3, 4, 5
    Gender Female 
    Name Anne Maria Hansen  [5
    Name Maria Hansen 
    Name Mariah Hansen 
    Name Mariah, Annie 
    Died 9 Mar 1920  Blanding, San Juan, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [5, 6, 7
    Cause: age 
    Annie Maria Black death certificate
    Annie Maria Black death certificate
    Buried 11 Mar 1920  Blanding City Cemetery, Blanding, San Juan, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [5, 8
    Maria H. Black grave marker
    Anne Marie Hansen Black grave marker
    Person ID I157000  Full Tree | Timmins, Frint
    Last Modified 26 Jun 2014 

    Father Anders B. Hansen
              b. 29 Jul 1802, Scow, Barrit, , Vejle Amt, Denmark Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 1 Jun 1884, Ephraim, Sanpete, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 81 years) 
    Mother Abelona Knudsen
              b. 17 Jan 1817, Verst, , Ribe Amt, Denmark Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 30 May 1875, Ephraim, Sanpete, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 58 years) 
    Married 25 Jul 1840  Verst, , Ribe Amt, Denmark Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    Family ID F87910  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Husband William Morley Black
              b. 11 Feb 1826, Vermillion, Ashland, Ohio, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 21 Jun 1915, Blanding, San Juan, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 89 years) 
    Married 26 Oct 1859  Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [3, 5
    Children 
    +1. Joseph Andrew Black
              b. 18 Sep 1861, Ephraim, Sanpete, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 20 Jan 1940, Boise, Ada, Idaho, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 78 years)
    +2. Rachel Ann Black
              b. 8 Mar 1863, Ephraim, Sanpete, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 5 May 1906, Pacheco, , Chihuahua, México Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 43 years)
    +3. Olive Myrtle Black
              b. 20 Jul 1865, Circleville, Piute, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 19 Oct 1949, Blanding, San Juan, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 84 years)
     4. William Sanford Black
              b. 10 Oct 1867, Circleville, Piute, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 5 Feb 1868, Beaver, Beaver, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
    +5. Miller Snow Black
              b. 27 Feb 1869, Orderville, Kane, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 17 Dec 1953, Huntington, Emery, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 84 years)
    +6. Harriet Drucilla Black
              b. 18 Sep 1871, Orderville, Kane, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 4 Mar 1965, Orderville, Kane, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 93 years)
    +7. David Patten Black
              b. 10 Feb 1874, Orderville, Kane, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 20 Oct 1958, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 84 years)
    +8. Morley Larsen Black
              b. 24 Oct 1875, Orderville, Kane, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 6 Sep 1951, Blanding, San Juan, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 75 years)
    +9. Abloune Black
              b. 6 Apr 1880, Orderville, Kane, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 22 Jul 1959, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 79 years)
    Last Modified 24 Jun 2014 
    Family ID F81794  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 19 Nov 1840 - Egtved, , Vejle Amt, Denmark Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 26 Oct 1859 - Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Joseph Andrew Black - 18 Sep 1861 - Ephraim, Sanpete, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Rachel Ann Black - 8 Mar 1863 - Ephraim, Sanpete, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Olive Myrtle Black - 20 Jul 1865 - Circleville, Piute, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - William Sanford Black - 10 Oct 1867 - Circleville, Piute, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Miller Snow Black - 27 Feb 1869 - Orderville, Kane, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Harriet Drucilla Black - 18 Sep 1871 - Orderville, Kane, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - David Patten Black - 10 Feb 1874 - Orderville, Kane, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Morley Larsen Black - 24 Oct 1875 - Orderville, Kane, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Abloune Black - 6 Apr 1880 - Orderville, Kane, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - Cause: age - 9 Mar 1920 - Blanding, San Juan, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - 11 Mar 1920 - Blanding City Cemetery, Blanding, San Juan, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend Location Cemetery Hospital Town Parish City County/Shire State/Province Country Region Not Set

  • Photos
    Anne Maria Hansen
    Anne Maria Hansen
    Anne Marie Hansen Black
    Ring and pincushion belonging to Maria

    Histories
    Biography
    Biography

    Census
    1860 Census for Anna Marie Hansen Black
    1870 Census Washington, Utah
    1880 Census for Anne Maria Hansen Black

  • Notes 
    • 1. Headstones at Blanding Cemetary.

      Her son described her as a martinette

      Her name was Maria, but they pronounced it Mariah.

           Maria Hansen, wife of William M. Black, was born Nov. 19, 1840 in Egtved, Veile amt, Denmark, the daughter of Anders Hansen and Ablone Knudsen.  Becoming a convert to "Mormonism" she was baptized when quite young and emigrated from her native land in 1855, crossing the Atlantic and the plains in Canute Peterson's company. 
           She became the wife of Wm. M. Black, Oct. 26, 1859, and has resided successively at Manti, Nephi, Ephriam, Circleville, Beaver, Washington, Glendale, Orderville, Huntington, and Blanding in Utah, Pacheco, in Old Mexico, and at Fruitland, in New Mexico.  While residing in Sanpete county she witnessed the terrors of the Black Hawk war, her husbands' brother and brother-in-law being killed by Indians.  In Circle valley the family was robbed of their all and driven from their homes. 
           Again, when her husband was 86 years of age, the family was driven from Old Mexico, losing their home and everything they possessed.  Sister Black is a woman of great faith, having witnessed many instantaneous healings by the power of faith.  She was a plural wife for forty years and rejoiced in that order of marriage, glorifying the name of the Lord for that grand principle which gave her a loving husband and a family of virtuous, noble children.
      ***

      The History of
      Anne Maria Hansen Black

      This information was taken from her mother's history by O. C. Brienholt and the Black Family book in possession of Clella Blackner, and the family group sheet.  History arranged for Clella Blackner by Nora Lund, D.U.P historian.  Dec. 1970.

      Anne Maria Hansen Black was born 19 Nov. 1840 at Egtved, Veile, Denmark.  She was the oldest child of a family of 5 children born to Anders and Abelone Knudsen Hansen.  There was Joran, then a little brother who died, a sister Anne and a sister Christiana.

      Anne Maria was always called Maria.  (pronounced Mariah)  When she was 11 years old her mother joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on July 4th, 1852.  Her father wasn't converted to Mormonism at that time, but he was willing to accompany his family to America and Utah.

      The Hansen family joined a group of Saints who left Copenhagen, Denmark the forepart of December 1855.  The North Sea was rough and the little boats tossed about with their passengers.  They arrived in Liverpool, England ready to sail for America.

      It was on Wednesday the 12th of December when Maria, who had just turned 15, her father-age 53, and her Mother, age 38, brother Joren, 11, sister Anne 4 years old, went aboard the large sailing ship, the 'John J. Boyd'.   Knud Peterson, a native of Norway returning home from a mission, was in charge of the 512 saints.  There were those of the Scandinavian countries, those from Britain and those from Italy on the ship. 

      There was much sickness on the ship and they hadn't progressed very far before Joren Hansen died and was buried in the sea.  This made a great and sad impression on Maria to have her dear brother put over-board.

      It took nearly 2 months for the 'John J. Boyd' to cross the Atlantic ocean.  It was Feb. 15, 1856 when they landed at New York harbor, at a place called Castle Gardens, a formidable place. 

      According to the book, Treasures of Pioneer History, Vol. 5, we find that part of the company remained in Iowa and Illinois for some time, while a portion continued on to Utah the same season via St. Louis and Florence.  Here in St. Louis, Missouri, the grim reaper, death, again visited the Hansen family and took five year old Anne.  This vacancy was filled, somewhat, by the arrival of a baby girl born 7 April, 1856.  She was given the name of Christiana.

      It was while the Hansens were in St. Louis that Maria's father, Anders was baptized a member of the Church on March 7, 1856.

      By June the weather was suitable for the waiting Saints to commence the long trek across the plains.  Elder Knud Peterson gathered up his Scandinavian Saints and, as their Captain, they left Florence, Nebraska on June 10th.  There were 320 souls with 60 wagons in the group.  They arrived in Salt Lake City on 20 Sept. 1856.

      In those early days of colonization in the Utah territory, President Young wisely sent the Scandinavian emigrants to Sanpete County where they could better cope with the cold climate.  Then too, they would be happier among their own nationality.  Thus is was that Anne Maria Hansen grew up in the little town of Ephriam, where her parents settled.  Times were hard, but this young lady adjusted well to her new surroundings and made friends in the community.

      Plural marriage was being practiced and preached very extensively by the Church Authorities during these years so that the territory could be peopled more quickly to make Utah a great commonwealth.

      It was William Morley Black who approached 19 year old Maria Hansen on the subject of marriage.  He was 33 years old and already had 2 wives, but she accepted him and they were married on the 25th of October 1859.  She was yet to share her husband with 2 other women, Louisa, a young girl and Marinda, a widow.  It was in Ephriam that her first 2 children were born, Joseph Andrew on the 18th of September 1861 and Rachel Ann on 8 March 1863.

      In the spring of 1865 some families were called from Sanpete to go make a settlement in Circle Valley, Sevier County.  William Black was among the group and it was here that Maria gave birth to her next 2 children, Olive Myrtle on 20 July 1965 and William Sanford born 10 October 1867, who died as a child.

      As well as trying to eke out a scanty living from the virgin soil, the settlers lived in constant fear of the marauding Indians who were stealing the stock and even killing many of the settlers.  William's brother Benjamin and his brother-in-law were killed in Ephriam Canyon while after wood.

      Finally, in 1867, President Young advised the Circle Valley Saints to move to larger settlements.  The Blacks moved to Beaver, where William got work in a gristmill, which he was very apt in operating.  Then he was called to go to Dixie and run President Erastus Snow's gristmill at Washington.  He moved his wife Maria to Washington, but he didn't like his families to be separated, so he moved the other wives there also.

      When his contract was expired he moved his families to Long Valley where he ran a gristmill at Orderville.  This was Maria's home for quite a few years, where the remaining members of her family were born, namely: Miller Snow, 27 February 1869;  Harriet, 18 September 1871;  David Patten, 10 February 1874;  Morley Larsen, 24 October 1875 and Ablona, 5 April 1880.

      Maria did her assigned duties well in the United Order plan that was carried out quite successfully in this little community.  When the Order was dissolved, William moved his families to Huntington, Castle Valley, where he supported his wives and children by working in the Sealey Brothers' gristmill for 3 years.

      It was at this time that the United States Government passed laws against polygamy.  Men, who hated the Mormons, were sworn in as marshals to arrest the men living with more than one wife.  For one year William Black dodged these ruthless U.S. marshals, hiding out to prevent being taken to jail.  He had taken these wives according to the Church laws and council and he had a responsibility to them and his children.  It was a time of sore trial to all.  The Church leaders, realizing that something had to be done to protect these polygamist men, secured land in Old Mexico and advised them to take their wives and children and go there.

      On 13 November 1889, Maria's husband took his wife, Louisa and her young family and skipped for Old Mexico.  They arrived in Colonia Diaz, Chihuahua, early the summer of 1892.  (He had visited along the way with relatives.)  Two of his wives had died, but Maria and Marinda still lived in Huntington.  He always tried to keep his families together so he wrote to have them come to Mexico.  At this time Maria was 50 years old and Marinda was getting along in years also, but they joined a group who were going to Mexico.

      Thus it was that Maria arrived in Diaz with this group who were tired and discouraged.  Marinda's son-in-law built an adobe house for her.  Maria went to Juarez with her husband where he had employment in a flourmill.  Later, she lived in Pacheco with her son David and his family.  After an illness, her husband came there and lived with them for 2 years.  (His wife Louisa took her family and went back to the states.)  William went to Fruitland, New Mexico to visit some of his children and bought property there, but Maria and Marinda's children were so well established in Mexico, that they did not want to leave, so he sold it and came back to Pacheco in 1906.  He lived there with Maria and her sons, David and Morley.  With their help he built a nice 4 room brick house, and Maria was happy.

      Everything went well until in 1912, when the rebel war broke out.  President Taft advised all Americans to leave Mexico, but the Mormons hoped peace would soon be restored, but it was not so.  The Mormons were hard working, industrious people and in their towns could be found all the necessities for war.  Then bedlam broke loose, the Mexicans stole everything they could get their hands on.  They didn't hesitate to kill any Mormons who got in their way.

      On Sunday, July 28th, 1912 in Maria's town, a messenger arrived telling the people to be ready to leave the country by Tuesday.  All was excitement and concern, but they really thought they would be able to return soon.  They were obliged to leave with nothing of their worldly goods.

      Among these refugees was Maria's sister, Christiane, who had married Jen Christen Brienholt as his plural wife and had also gone to Mexico some 25 years before.  (The Brienholts returned to Redmond to live.)

      Space in this history does not permit a detailed account of the loss and difficulties of the 400  Latter-day Saints who were forced to leave on such short notice.  At Pearson the people were crowded onto the railroad cars which took them to El Paso, Texas.  Here they were treated kindly by the people and the Government promptly appropriated $100,000 to give aid to these homeless Saints.

      On August 10th, 1912, Maria and her husband were furnished a railroad pass to Price, Utah.  It was a sad day for them to say good-bye to their friends and family who were going to other places.

      Upon arriving in Price, the Blacks were met by their son Miller and taken to his home in Huntington where they were received kindly by their family members.  They spent a delightful year visiting with relatives and friends throughout the state.  In the fall of 1913 their children in Blanding, San Juan County sent them money to come there to make their home.  They lived there happily the rest of their lives.

      William Morley Black died in Blanding on June 21, 1915 at the age of 89.  Maria lived on for 5 years, being lovingly cared for by members of her family.  She died 9 March 1920 ( 80 years old) and was laid beside her husband to await the resurrection day.
      ***

      ANNA MARIA HANSEN BLACK
      By Cloe Truman Anderson
           Anna Maria Hansen was born the 18 November, l840 at Egtvd, Vejle, Denmark. She was the first child born to Andrew or Anders “B.” Hansen and Abelonne Knudsen Hansen. The L.D.S. missionaries in about l850 introduced her parents to the gospel. The family left Denmark to go to America when Maria was about l5 years old and Jorgen was l2. Andrew and Abelonne had been blessed with two sons and three daughters. Leaving behind one daughter Ann and one son who were stillborn.
           The shipping list gives the names of the following family members who were on board the sailing vessel the John J. Boyd:
      Anders or Andrew Hansen (father) born 1804
      Ablonia Hansen (mother) born 1818
      Anna Marie Hansen born 1840
      Jorgen Hansen (brother) born 1845
      Rasmus Hansen (uncle) born 1808
      Bennedikl (aunt) born 1818
      Neils Hansen (cousin) born 1833
      Karen Hansen (cousin) born 1834
           It could be assumed that two brothers, their wives and families set sail for Zion at the same time, aboard the John J Boyd.
           On the twenty ninth of November 1855, four hundred and thirty seven Scandinavian Saints sailed from Copenhagen, Denmark, on board the steamship Loven, under the direction of Elder Canute Peterson, who was returning from his mission to Norway. After a pleasant voyage to Kiel, Germany the emigrants continued the journey by rail to Gluckstadt, Germany thence by steamer to Grimsby, England and thence by rail to Liverpool, England where the Scandinavian emigrants were joined by forty-two British and thirty Italian Saints, and went on board the sailing ship, John J. Boyd. A total of 512 Saints were on board. The price of passages on the Emerald Isle and the John J. Boyd were 45 shillings for adults, 35 shillings for children and 10 shillings for infants. Just before they sailed, Apostle Franklin D. Richards came on board and gave many encouraging remarks and bade farewell, after which they set sail and were soon lost from all sight of land.
            The Saints sang often and trusted in the Lord for safety. The captain of the ship became so angry that he forbade the Saints to sing. He was a very disagreeable man, as was the first mate who whipped the sailors and crew with a long black whip. On 11 January 1856 a ship near by was destroyed by the wind, and the ship rescued thirty seamen on it, but the first mate was very unkind to them. The weather was very unsettled and approximately sixty children and old folks died. Most of them died from an outbreak of measles. Anders and Ablonne’s son Jorgen was one of the children who died of the measles and was buried at sea. It was a great heartache for the family.
           Many of the passengers became seasick. The voyage was not a pleasant one and the vessel was not equipped for so many people, they suffered many disadvantages. There were tiers of bunks all around the sides of the vessel and boxes in the center. They were compelled to eat off the boxes used to sit on. Two weeks after boarding the ship a terrific storm came up; it tossed the ship from side to side with the boxes sliding from one side of the ship to the other. This storm continued for almost two weeks. It split the masts, and all of the sails had to be taken down. The captain became so discouraged, with the terrible weather, their lack of good food, water and the illnesses that they were afflicted with, that he forbids anyone to sing or pray. Elder Peterson admonished the Saints to fast and pray in secret. They were blessed because of their faith and prayers and better weather prevailed. It was a great joy for them to leave the vessel and be able to walk again on solid ground.
           They arrived in New York Harbor, 16 February 1856 after a journey of eleven weeks and three days on very rough waters. After tarrying a few days at Castle Gardens, New York the journey was continued on the twenty-first or the twenty-second by rail via Dunkirk and Cleveland, Ohio to Chicago, Illinois. The emigrants divided into three groups: one group of one hundred and fifty went to Burlington, Iowa; one group of about one hundred and fifty went to Alton, Illinois; and the third group with the Andrew Hansen family went to St. Louis, Missouri. Shortly after arriving in St. Louis, Abelonne gave birth to a baby girl. She was born 07 April 1856, and was named Christiane. Soon after her birth they continued their journey to Florence, Nebraska and joined the general emigration that crossing the plains via wagon train.
           Elder Canute Peterson was their Captain and appointed an assistant captain for each ten wagons. They started their journey for Salt Lake City, 19 June 1856 the 10th company of eleven to travel in 1856. The first day’s journey was a hard one. Some of their oxen were wild and they did not know how to handle them and consequently did not make much headway the first day. It was very hot and the oxen became very tired, some traveling with their tongues hanging out. A few of the oxen got overheated and died. They were compelled to leave some of their supplies because there were fewer animals to pull the loads. In about two weeks they reached the unsettled Wild West, where they saw great herds of buffalo.
           One day there was a buffalo stampede and the oxen became frightened, running together, one outfit crashing into another. The women and children became frightened, some of the wagons were broken and a number of the party was injured and one man was killed, which caused a gloom to come into the group. He was buried in a coffin such as they could build. They then repaired their outfits and journeyed on. A few of the buffalo were killed and dressed for meat and divided among the company.
           Now and again the Indians were seen roaming from one side of the valley to the other and on occasions they would come to visit. In order to maintain a friendly feeling, they would oft times give them some of the supplies and provisions, such as they could spare. They were compelled to guard the oxen at all times when they were not traveling to prevent them from being driven away or stolen by the Indians. They were called together morning and night by the sound of a bugle to receive instructions. Sundays they had meetings and regular services were conducted adding much comfort and pleasure to the journey. Sometimes they had dances on the green grass and enjoyed themselves as best they could. During the days while journeying along, nearly all of them walked except those who were sick and the smaller children. They went along laughing and singing the songs and hymns of Zion.
           Canute Peterson was a wise leader and captain for the company. When they arrived in Salt Lake City, it was said of the oxen of the company, that they were the fattest of all, which had yet crossed the plains. He traveled fast where there was little feed, then when they came to good grazing; they slowed down and sometimes stopped a day or two to let the oxen rest and eat.
           They arrived in Salt Lake City, 20 September 1856 and on the entire journey of three months not more than a half dozen persons were seen outside of the company members. Upon their arrival in Salt Lake City, they spent a few days and were told that the Saints from Denmark were settling in Sanpete County over a hundred miles south of Salt Lake. Sanpete County was settled in 1850 and the community willingly helped the new immigrants with provisions and helped them get established in the area. They went south to Sanpete County and settled in Ephraim, Utah with the Saints from Scandinavia who had made the journey with them. Little is known of the living conditions and the trials that confronted them in the high mountain ranges and valleys of Sanpete County.
           On the 26th of October, 1856 Maria married William Morley Black. She was 14 years younger; she married into polygamous family as Mr. Black already had two wives. The first was Margaret Ruth Banks, second was Amy Jane Washburn. They lived in Ephraim for several years. Anna’s oldest son and daughter were both in this community. They left Sanpete County in 1865 because the Prophet Brigham Young called them to go to Circle Valley in Piute County, to help build up a settlement there. They lived there for about four years where their next two children were born, Olive Myrtle and William. They were plagued with Indian harassment and problems all the time they were in the area, so they were instructed to move down to Beaver County. They lived there for a few years and were called to go to Washington County. Miller Snow and Harriet were both born in Washington, Washington County. The next nine years were spent in Kane County a short time in Glendale and about six years living the United Order in Orderville. David Patten Black was born in Glendale and Morley L. Black and Ablonna Black were both born in Orderville.
           President Brigham Young sent Howard O. Spencer to preside over the United Order community. He was greatly beloved by the people, but in due time he was replaced by Thomas Chamberlain, he was very gifted in financial matters and led the community from poverty to comfort. They consecrated all of their property to the order, which meant that everything was held in common by the members of the community. William Morley Black, her husband, was secretary of the order as well as supervisor of the community kitchen; Maria was a midwife and helped with the birth of many babies while they lived in Orderville. Under the leadership of Brigham Young the United Order was successful and flourished, but the Prophet died in 1877 and many problems arose. No one seemed capable of solving the problems, and keeping the community together, so in 1884 they left the community and moved to Huntington, Utah, it was almost two hundred miles north and east of Orderville.
           They lived in Huntington for four years, William worked in the gristmill in that community, but the Federal Marshall’s of the United States were looking for all the men who had more than one wife, to arrest them and put them in jail. William decided to leave the United States and go to Old Mexico where they were not pursued and hunted by the Federal Marshall’s. Leaving Huntington on the 13th of November 1888. He took Louisa and the youngest family with him; Maria and Marinda stayed in Huntington. In October of 1890 Miller S. Black, his brother with a group, took their mother, Maria Hansen and Marinda Thompson Black in two covered wagons and started for Old Mexico. It was a long, rough journey, there was hardly a trail to follow, but they reached Diaz, Mexico shortly before Christmas in 1890. They were tired and very discouraged for it was a hard, barren land that they had come to. They moved into a two roomed, Mexican adobe house with a dirt roof. A short time after they moved to Juarez, Mexico where William had work at a gristmill. They moved to a farm near Cave Valley, Mexico but the climate and weather conditions were not suitable for farming and moved to Pacheco, Mexico. She spent twenty-two years living in the foothills of the Sierra Madre Mountains in Northern Old Mexico under very harsh conditions. Most of the colonists were farmers or ranchers so the children all had to learn to work early in life.
           In 1910 was the beginning of the Mexican Revolution, the colonists tried to remain neutral, but each faction of the warring nation would plunder and steal from the colonists. After two years of having their livestock and poultry stolen, their saddles, harnesses, weapons, wagons and everything they had that the rebels could use, was taken from them. On 28 July 1912 a messenger came just as Sabbath meeting was closing and gave them notice that the entire community must be ready to leave by Tuesday morning. Twenty-two wagons were loaded and started their journey back to the United States. They were put on train cars at Pearson, Texas and began their ride to El Paso, Texas. The U.S. Government under the direction of President William H. Taft appropriated $100,000. to be used in giving aid to the American refugees who were expelled from Mexico.
           On August 10, 1912, William and Maria were furnished with a railroad pass to take them to Price, Utah. After a two-day train ride they arrived in Price to a welcoming committee of many of their children. They went to Huntington and stayed with Miller and his family for two and one half months. Then they went to Ferron and stayed with Isaac for six weeks and returned to Huntington and stayed with Martin for six weeks. They stayed the remainder of the winter and spring back at Isaac’s in Ferron. They visited in Richfield, Monroe and Redmond for a month and on the 1st of October 1913 they boarded the train at Price and reached Thompson, they rode the mail truck to Moab and went to Blanding via team and wagon. They lived with sons and daughters in that community and William died at the home of his daughter Tamer B, Young 21st of June 1915.
           Maria lived with family members and reached her 79th birthday in 1919. She was a faithful wife and mother and knew sacrifice and hardship. She had lived in three countries, and spoke three languages. She died 09 March 1920 and was buried the next day. She, William, and Sarah Marinda are buried in the Blanding Cemetery.
      Listed below are her children. She had nine children and raised eight to adulthood.
      ***

      Comment by Nora Black - granddaughter:
      Maria (Mariah) died of Dropsy.  When she died she was full of water and looked very big when laid out at Theda’s. [5]

  • Sources 
    1. [S2244] Theda Laws or Irene Louise Potter, Personal Genealogical Research, Compiled.

    2. [S1535] Personal knowledge of Clark Timmins, [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE]\..

    3. [S41] Utah State Board of Health, Utah State Divisions of Archives & History, Digital Images of Death Certificates Utah State Archives  (http://historyresearch.utah.gov/indexes/index.html :n.d.), death certificate 49-190020 (1949), Myrtle Olive Palmer, accessed 15 Aug 2008..

    4. [S2905] Family Records.

    5. [S2891] Personal knowledge of Marla Kirby, [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE]\..

    6. [S2741] (..

    7. [S2744] Death Certificates  death certificate.

    8. [S1543] Utah State History, "Cemetery and Burial Database," database, Utah State History - Burials Database    (http://history.utah.gov/apps/burials/execute/searchburials, 2009), 1 47 2 8.


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