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Lydia Knight

Lydia Knight[1, 2]

Female 1844 - 1905  (60 years)  Submit Photo / DocumentSubmit Photo / Document

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  • Name Lydia Knight  [3
    Born 6 Jun 1844  Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Gender Female 
    Died 8 May 1905  Colonia Dublán, , Chihuahua, México Find all individuals with events at this location  [3, 4, 5
    Buried Colonia Dublán, , Chihuahua, México Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Headstones Submit Headstone Photo Submit Headstone Photo 
    Person ID I227159  Full Tree | Timmins, Frint
    Last Modified 7 Jul 2015 

    Father Newel Knight
              b. 13 Sep 1800, Marlboro, Windham, Vermont, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 11 Jan 1847, Fort Niobrara, Knox, Nebraska, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 46 years) 
    Mother Lydia Goldthwaite
              b. 9 Jun 1812, Sutton, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 3 Apr 1884, Saint George, Washington, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 71 years) 
    Married 23 Nov 1835  Kirtland, Lake, Ohio, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [3, 5, 6, 7, 8
    Family ID F61650  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Husband John Ray Young
              b. 30 Apr 1837, Kirtland, Lake, Ohio, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 15 Sep 1931, Provo, Utah, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 94 years) 
    Married 1 Jan 1861  Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [3, 4
    Children 
     1. Lydia Roseanna Young
              b. 28 Oct 1862, Provo, Utah, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 29 Dec 1915, Kirtland, San Juan, New Mexico, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 53 years)
     2. Joseph Smith Young
              b. 5 Apr 1868, Washington, Washington, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 21 May 1868, Washington, Washington, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
     3. Hyrum Smith Young
              b. 5 Apr 1868, Washington, Washington, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 24 May 1868, Washington, Washington, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
     4. Persis Vilate Young
              b. 25 Dec 1875, Orderville, Kane, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 16 Mar 1893, Lyman, Wayne, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 17 years)
     5. Newel Knight Young
              b. 21 Aug 1877, Orderville, Kane, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 15 Aug 1956, Long Beach, Los Angeles, California, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 78 years)
    +6. Howard Spencer Young
              b. 30 Oct 1880, Orderville, Kane, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 6 Mar 1912, Colonia Dublán, , Chihuahua, México Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 31 years)
    +7. Edward Webb Young
              b. 24 May 1882, Orderville, Kane, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 22 Jan 1928, Dry Valley, Lincoln, Nevada, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 45 years)
    Last Modified 26 Jun 2014 
    Family ID F68361  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 6 Jun 1844 - Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 1 Jan 1861 - Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Lydia Roseanna Young - 28 Oct 1862 - Provo, Utah, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Joseph Smith Young - 5 Apr 1868 - Washington, Washington, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Hyrum Smith Young - 5 Apr 1868 - Washington, Washington, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Persis Vilate Young - 25 Dec 1875 - Orderville, Kane, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Newel Knight Young - 21 Aug 1877 - Orderville, Kane, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Howard Spencer Young - 30 Oct 1880 - Orderville, Kane, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Edward Webb Young - 24 May 1882 - Orderville, Kane, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 8 May 1905 - Colonia Dublán, , Chihuahua, México Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - Colonia Dublán, , Chihuahua, México Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend Location Cemetery Hospital Town Parish City County/Shire State/Province Country Region Not Set

  • Photos
    Lydia Knight
    Lydia Knight Young oval
    Patriarchal  blessing of Lydia Knight

  • Notes 
    • From the DUP (Daughters of Utah Pioneers) lesson manual for Feb., 2009:
           Lydia Knight was born June 6, 1844, in Nauvoo, Illinois, to Newel Knight and Lydia Goldthwaite Knight.  Her parents had joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and eventually crossed the plains to the Great Salt Lake Valley.
           Lydia was seventeen when she became the plural wife of John Ray Young on January 1, 1861.  He was the son of Lorenzo Dow Young, the youngest brother of Brigham Young.  In speaking of his wife, John R. Young said, “Lydia was a bright, cheery spirit, and I was proud of her”.  The two wives lived in great harmony.
           The fall after they were married, John R. Young was called to Dixie.  There settled in Santa Clara in a rude home on a few acres of cleared land.  A flood came and destroyed almost everything.  The next spring he was called to drive an ox team to Omaha, Nebraska, to get some cotton gins and spinning jennies for the community.  When he returned, he found Lydia in Provo with a new baby.  In the fall he returned to Santa Clara with the machinery and found his first wife, Albina, and baby well but still living in a tent.  He was called away on other Church assignments, but when he returned he found his two wives living in a one-room adobe house built by his brother-in-law, Samuel Knight.  He erected a small hewn-log house.  It was hardly finished before he received a letter calling him on a mission to the Sandwich Islands (Hawaii), and he left on March 10, 1864.
           After his return, John worked for three years in the cotton factory in the town of Washington but was called to take his family to Kane County to live the United Order.
           For seven years, Lydia lived in Orderville, where she had charge of the millinery department.  The straw for braiding the hats was better if selected when the wheat was in the milk stage, just before it ripened.  Because the wheat was not good for making flour at this stage, a small patch was often planted for the main purpose of making hats.  The heads that were cut from the straw were then used for chicken feed.  At this stage of growth, the straw was pliable and soft and was more easily braided than when allowed to dry.  The women also made cloth hats of heavy denim.  They had hat patterns that consisted of triangular pieces cut out for the crown and a straight round piece for the brim.  The sections for the crown were sewed together, and this, in turn, was sewn to the brim which was usually made of two thicknesses of the cloth with a thinner piece placed between to serve as padding.  They were made in various colors and starched to make them keep their shape.  Some were also quilted.  They were adorned with flowers made of material called book-muslin that resembled organdy.
           Lydia also did beautiful bead work, and the Pioneer memorial Museum has some choice picture frames that she made for her family.  They are located on the second floor of the museum, directly across from the board room in Case #36. 
           After the death of President Brigham Young, the support of the Order faded, and John withdrew.  Lydia was disappointed because she was much in favor of the social system with “no rich, no poor.” 
           When the anti-polygamy laws were passed, John’s father Lorenzo Dow Young, advised him to go to Mexico for safety.  He had three wives at the time, but his first wife, Albina, stayed in Loa, Utah.  John lost his arm in an accident and felt he could not successfully compete with Mexican labor so he returned to the United States.  Lydia, believing that bitterness and violence would continue in the United States, decided to stay and make her home in Dublan, Mexico.  John deeded the little farm to her and returned to the United States with his third wife.  Later, John realized his mistake in leaving Lydia there without a husband’s help, but by nature she was proud and spirited and appeared to do well.
           Lydia was a teacher, and she served twice as first counselor in the Relief Society and later as president of the Primary.  Some loving remembrances were sent to her children by friends.  Melissa Wilson wrote, “In 1891 she taught the primary class I was in.  She was very sweet.  Children loved her and drew near to her.  Because there weren’t any outlined lessons, she taught Bible and faith-promoting stories.  All called her Aunt Lydia… when [I was] twelve years old, my father went to Deming for supplies, and I stayed with ‘Aunt Lydia’ and slept in her bed.  The next morning she made gingerbread and gave me a piece with a glass of milk to drink.  Now (1956) as I look back, I wonder where she obtained the ingredients to make the gingerbread.  She was very poor.  Her home was a one-room adobe house.  Her bed [was] in the corner, and [she had] crude furniture.  She made me feel I was her own…..She told the primary children about the poverty in Salt Lake.  The children looked forward to having butter and milk when the cow came in fresh, but her mother sent the first tenth to the bishop for tithing.”
           Richard L. Evans, in one of his “Spoken Word” sermons, said, “How can anyone ever learn, if someone doesn’t care enough to correct.”  The following letter shows the love and concern Lydia had for her son:
      My dear boy Edward,
           I have been thinking of you so much since you went back and wondering what you are doing and how you are feeling.  All the comfort I have in the world is what I have with you boys.  The Lord only knows the aches this old heart has had, and there is no help for it, only as you boys are good.  If you will only make good men, I will be paid for it all…. I feel that I can promise you that if you make yourself a suitable champion for a pure sweet girl, the Lord will lead you to her.    Sometimes I am afraid you tamper with tobacco a little.  But you surely are not going to let a nasty filthy weed be your master.   There is too much manhood at your command…. May the lord bless you and give you comfort and strength to do His will andto be a man after His own way is the sincere prayer of [your] mother.”
           Lydia Knight Young died in Colonia Dublan, Mexico, on May 8, 1905. [3]

  • Sources 
    1. [S2244] Theda Laws or Irene Louise Potter, Personal Genealogical Research, Compiled.

    2. [S1535] Personal knowledge of Clark Timmins, [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE]\..

    3. [S2891] Personal knowledge of Marla Kirby, [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE]\..

    4. [S2911] Darrel Knight, Knight Family File.

    5. [S2892] The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints [LDS]., "International Genealogical Index." Digital images.  ( FamilySearch . http://www.familysearch.org), (http://www.familysearch.org)..

    6. [S1098] Sarah P. Collinwood, The Descendants of George Palmer and Phebe Draper  (Provo, UT: J. Grant Stevenson, 1962.), 444..

    7. [S1129] The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, International Genealogical Index (R)  (Copyright (c) 1980, 2002, data as of April 3, 2007).

    8. [S2900] William G. Hartley, Stand by My Servant Joseph  (Deseret Book 2003).


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