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Prudence Wilcox

Prudence Wilcox[1, 2]

Female 1787 - 1872  (84 years)  Submit Photo / DocumentSubmit Photo / Document

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  • Name Prudence Wilcox  [3
    Born 6 Dec 1787  Middletown Township, Delaware, Pennsylvania, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Christened 20 Nov 1831  Roxborough, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Female 
    Name Prudence Wilcoks 
    Died 23 Nov 1872  Colfax, Jasper, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Buried Abt 26 Nov 1872  McKeever Cemetery, Colfax, Jasper, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Prudence Collins grave marker
    Prudence Wilcox Collins grave marker
    Prudence Wilcox Headstone
    Person ID I227712  Full Tree | Timmins, Frint
    Last Modified 26 Jun 2014 

    Father John Willcox
              b. Abt 1755, Upper Providence, Delaware, Pennsylvania, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 1 Oct 1818, Middletown Township, Delaware, Pennsylvania, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Mother Sarah Walton
              b. 1758, Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 28 Feb 1830, Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married Abt 1777  Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [3, 4, 5
    Family ID F87662  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Husband 1 Johann Christoph Kirchner
              b. 7 Aug 1788, Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 2 Apr 1826, Manayunk, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 37 years) 
    Married 6 Oct 1809  Old First Reformed Church, Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [3, 6
    • Name on records is Christian Kirchner and Prudence Wilcoks [3]
    Children 
     1. Caroline Kartchner
              b. 11 Oct 1810, Merion Township, Montgomery, Pennsylvania, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 27 Apr 1814, Merion Township, Montgomery, Pennsylvania, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 3 years)
    +2. Peter Woliver Kartchner
              b. 29 Aug 1812, Merion Township, Montgomery, Pennsylvania, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 7 Apr 1868, Colfax, Jasper, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 55 years)
    +3. Margaretta Kartchner
              b. 9 Jul 1814, Roxborough, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 24 Apr 1870, Independence, Jasper, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 55 years)
    +4. John Christopher Kartchner, Jr.
              b. 13 Nov 1816, Merion Township, Montgomery, Pennsylvania, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 30 Jun 1911, Colfax, Jasper, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 94 years)
     5. Mark Kartchner
              b. 18 Apr 1819, Merion Township, Montgomery, Pennsylvania, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 23 Apr 1819, Merion Township, Montgomery, Pennsylvania, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
    +6. William Decatur Kartchner
              b. 4 May 1820, Haverford, Montgomery, Pennsylvania, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 14 May 1892, Snowflake, Navajo, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 72 years)
    +7. Sarah Ann Kartchner
              b. 7 Sep 1823, Merion Township, Montgomery, Pennsylvania, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 11 Sep 1907, Saint Joseph, Buchanan, Missouri, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 84 years)
    Last Modified 25 Jun 2014 
    Family ID F87840  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Husband 2 Francis B. Collins
              d. 3 Oct 1850, Savannah, Chatham, Georgia, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married 11 Dec 1833  [3
    Last Modified 26 Jun 2014 
    Family ID F68376  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 6 Dec 1787 - Middletown Township, Delaware, Pennsylvania, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 6 Oct 1809 - Old First Reformed Church, Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Caroline Kartchner - 11 Oct 1810 - Merion Township, Montgomery, Pennsylvania, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Peter Woliver Kartchner - 29 Aug 1812 - Merion Township, Montgomery, Pennsylvania, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Margaretta Kartchner - 9 Jul 1814 - Roxborough, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - John Christopher Kartchner, Jr. - 13 Nov 1816 - Merion Township, Montgomery, Pennsylvania, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Mark Kartchner - 18 Apr 1819 - Merion Township, Montgomery, Pennsylvania, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - William Decatur Kartchner - 4 May 1820 - Haverford, Montgomery, Pennsylvania, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - Sarah Ann Kartchner - 7 Sep 1823 - Merion Township, Montgomery, Pennsylvania, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChristened - 20 Nov 1831 - Roxborough, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 23 Nov 1872 - Colfax, Jasper, Iowa, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - Abt 26 Nov 1872 - McKeever Cemetery, Colfax, Jasper, Iowa, United States Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend Location Cemetery Hospital Town Parish City County/Shire State/Province Country Region Not Set

  • Photos
    Prudence Wilcox Kartchner Collins
    Prudence Wilcox Kartchner
    Prudence Wilcox
    Peter Walover's House

    Census
    1830 Federal Census
    1856 Iowa State Census
    1860 Federal Census
    1870 Federal Census

  • Notes 
    • md. (2) 11 Dec 1833 Francis COLLINS

      Bapt when an adult in Roxborough Church, Philadelphia, PA 28 Feb 1830

      also spelled WILLCOX; WILCOKS

      1830 Census:  Prudence Kartchner of Lower Merion Township, 1 female 5-10, 1 Female 15-20, and 1 Female 40-50 years of age

      Kartchner Family History
      [htpp://home.earthlink.net/~jameshistory/p_wilcox.html] :
           "Prudence always liked flowers, and one of her neighbors, Sadie D. Hurst, wrote this about Prudence's flower garden: "There was no particular design or reason in the planting of her flower beds, herbs, and vines, other than she wanted fragrance and color.  It was a large garden enclosed with a high picket fence and painted white.  The little gate swung in and out on its rusted old hinges, and a grassy path led to the center where stood an old apple tree, strong and sturdy, the back of its trunk recording a lifetime of usefulness.  And yet in June time its pink blossoms added fragrance, mingling with the scent of roses. 
           "The old-fashioned flowers, pinks, marigolds, forget-me-nots, poppies and touch-me-nots with their seed pods that would curl up in your fingers when touched, were planted in small beds.  Walks through the garden were bordered with mignonette and lush in the background were hollyhocks of bright colors mingled with the golden sunflowers as they nodded and turned their faces to the sun.   The garden was an enchanting place of beauty and gragrance and here is where you would find her sitting, under the apple tree in a low rocking chair, welcoming friends who came to see her garden.  She wore a dress of black with a bit of lace at her throat and a cap with a little rosette of ribbon on her white curs.  Time had robbed away the curves nad coloring of youth, yet her eyes were sparkling and her cheeks still the same tint of apple blossoms.  Years had not taken from her face the beauty of her inner soul."

      Prudence came to Iowa in a canvas covered wagon when the lands were a waving plain of high grass, the Indians were roaming the wide praries, and only a few log houses had been built or farms made ready for planting.  She had endured hardships of pioneer life, her kindness and help in sickness in many homes always will be remembered, when no other help could be had in this raw country.  What changes have taken place since the days of great grandmother Collins!  She died November 23, 1872 at Colfax, Jasper County, Pennsylvania.


      From the journal of William Decatur Kartchner, a son:
           "Mr. Wilcox had six* children by Mrs. Wilcox: William, James, John, Prudence, Sarah and Ann.  The three boys became famous for papermaking.   Sarah Wilcox was married to a Mr. Ellis, a blacksmith, who would occasionally disturb the peace under the influence of whiskey and was of but little worth to his fellows excepting the good done hammering iron.  Ann Wilcox was a virtuous old maid who was much skilled in embroidery and lived and died at the house of her sister Prudence, age about forty, at a place called Manayunk, six miles west of Philadelphia.  She was buried in the old Baptist Church yard on the Ridge Road, one mile north of residence.  Sarah Ellis lived in Philadelphia until about the year 1830.  She took a fever and died.  What became of Ellis was unknown to me.         (*seven, they also had a daughter named Mary)

      "John C. became much attached to Miss Prudence, and being raised together almost, thus they became much attached to each other and were married about the year 1804** or 5."
      (** records indicate 1809)  

           "Prudence had seven children: Caroline, Peter Woliver, Margaret, Mark, John C. William and Sarah Ann.  Caroline was born 11 Oct. 1810, and in 1812 the war broke out and Prudence's husband, John C. volunteered and went on shipboard and landed at Mobile; from thence to New Orleans immediately under General Jackson's command.  During his absence Peter Wolliver was born 29 Aug. 1812.  On John C.'s arrival home he was greatly rejoiced over his warrior, as he called him.  Margaret was born 9 July 1814.  She married James Webb, a Yorkshire man and blacksmith, contrary to the wishes of her father's family.
           John C., the father, went to work for himself papermaking and soon became the proprietor of a mill.  Business being brisk he hired hands and took apprentices, finally taking a partner in the business by the name of William Wolliver, his wife's cousin, who kept a book and paper store in Philadelphia who received the paper and sold and bought rags, vitriol and material for the mill.  Thus it ran along for some years, apparently prospering until a time John C., sent by the regular teamster for money and good to pay hands, Mr. Wolliver pronounced the firm broke.  Well known to John C., to the contrary notwithstanding, went immediately to Philadelphia to the store but books and things were so arranged as to be impossible to save himself.  He returned home, much down-countenanced by resolved  to go ahead.  The news was circulated soon that Kartchner-Wolliver & Co., were broke and soon the mill was attached and sold for debts.  The mill was situated eight miles west of Philadelphia on Mill Creek.  This course of things so discouraged John C., that he took to drink to drown trouble and would resent the least appearance of insult until it became a common thing for him to fight for not only his own wrongs but would fight for his supposed friends.

            Another son was born 13 Nov. 1816, called after himself, John C. Junior.   About this time he decided to emigrate to the west of Ohio but his wife, Prudence, objected.  He now worked journeywork from one mill to another and finally went to the Catskill Mountains and worked most part of one year, drinking hard and fighting often.  It began top tell on him.  He thought of entering suit against Mr. Wilcox for his wife's part of an estate in Philadelphia left to his children by Mr. Wilcox, but was drinking too much to save up a beginning.
           Another son was born, 4 May 1820 at Harford town, Montgomery Co., Penn.  He wanted to name the boy Decatur after Commodore Decatur.  Prudence wished to call his name William after her mother’s father, William Walton, so they called the boy William Decatur.  This boy became the writer of this history.
           John C., became much careworn from the once happy business agent papermaker down to what they called journeyman worker.  He was never known to quarrel with a man, Mr. Lavern told me, but would fight on the least intimation of insult.  Time passed swiftly without much interest to him.  A daughter was born 7 September 1823.
           John C., was a great Jackson man.  I was with him at the poles of an election when a man cried out, “Hurrah for Clay”.  No sooner had he said this than John C., confronted him, squared and struck him to the ground.  Another took it up and a second was felled to the ground and the third under went the same punishment.  The man held to him and a short encounter followed on the ground.  I was following crying for my father and by the time I could reach the spot all was over and Mr. Lavern said three men whipped.
           They called their daughter Sara Ann after her two aunts.  About this time John C., moved his family to Manayunk and shortly after John Wilcox, my mother’s youngest brother, came from Bucks Co., Penn., to visit the family.  He was a young man and a great musician.  He had three instruments, violin, clarinet, and flute, which was very amusing to me and I think brightened up the dull scenes of our home considerably.
           My father worked in the Manayunk Mills and my uncle, also a papermaker, worked with him and lived with my father.  It was common for men to work by piece and would generally complete their day’s work by two or three o’clock and then amuse the family with the sweet strains of music of evenings.  My mother also worked in the paper mill in the room called the soul picking paper and had her baby under the bench and a touch with her foot would keep it quiet in a kind of box cradle.
           In the winter of 1825 my father took sick by excessive drink and exposure.  Very bad rheumatic fever.  All was done that could be thought of by the medical faculty without success.  The old school doctor was then thought to be foremost in the healing acts.  My father lingered, receiving no benefit from anything until April 2, 1826.  He died leaving my mother with five children in poverty to support.
           Our connections came from Philadelphia and Bucks Co., to the funeral, which was a large attendance of carriages.  His remains were interred in the Dutch Churchyard seven miles southwest of Manayunk.  I was sitting on my uncle John’s lap and put my head out the window of the carriage when a sudden jolt caused the window to strike my chin which resulted in my tongue being bitten which caused me to renew my sobs and tears.
            I remained with mother some one year and she moved eight miles southwest to Mill Creek to Telenders Paper Mills.  Peter W., was an apprentice.  My brother, John C., worked in the mill for wages.  My mother also picked paper at a low rate of pay.  I was sent to school to a Mr. Hoffman, a Universalist.  One evening while coming from school a young man was imposing upon me and plaguing me when I tried to get away from him by running but when all my efforts were in vain at last I fought with him and he punished me severely.  When we arrived at the mill my brother, John C., saw the affair and called him to account for his conduct.  The young man answered saying he would punish him the same if he interfered.  They soon came together and without much talk a severe encounter ensued in which both were punished.  My brother had knocked out of joint both thumbs and before the mill hands came to them and parted them they had become desperate and when parted the young man was carried home and remained in bed some days.
           In the spring my mother took me to Mr. McKnight’s to be his cowboy.  I remained during the summer.  I thought the days a week long and cried to go home but they were very kind to me and gave me presents but I suffered in mind very much.  In the course of autumn Mr. McKnight died of consumption and was buried in the same yard that my father’s remains were buried the year before.  Soon after Mr. James McKnight came to administer the estate.  He was very kind to me and petted me which I had been used to at home and would take me with him in the old gig to the tavern.  He gave me the money to pay the hostler and for the drinks.  I felt quite to home again until the business was settled.  He returned to his home in Bucks Co., and I returned to my mother.  My parting with Mrs. Shoster, the lady who kept house for the consumptive old bachelor, was tender by this time.
           My uncle John came to visit my mother to Mill Creek and took me with him to stay one year as lay boy as he had rented a paper mill seven miles northeast of Manayunk.  My brother Peter was about to be whipped by Garret Hender, his master.  When he turned on him, tore a large lag from a spinning wheel and went for him.  He was sued by his master for assault and battery;  soon afterwards ran away and went to the far west and then south as far a New Orleans;  came back to Memphis, sick and had many warm friends.
           Next spring my uncle John took me with the family visiting my mother.   She had moved to Manayunk.  I stayed with her and went to work in a woolen mill the next winter at very low wages.  Next spring she sent me to school to a Mr. Murphy but I hated the school room and learned nothing.  I begged to go to the factory to work.  At last she consented and I went to work in a cotton factory piecing rolls on a mule.  I received two dollars per week and generally fifty cents for spending money which I bought tobacco with.  The residue I kept in a small stone jug.  I commenced the use of tobacco before I was five years old.
           I worked in cotton factory until I was twelve years old when my little finger of my right hand was caught in the cog wheel.  I was laid up six weeks with it.  I refused to return to the factory.  My mother said I must either go to the factory or go learn a trade that she could not support me.  She wanted me to learn the carpenter trade but I chose the blacksmith trade and was bound by indenture to Benjamin Miles for seven years and six months with a consideration of receiving one quarter of day school and one quarter night school.  The year before my brother, John C., went apprentice to learn the coachsmith business at ninety-six dollars per year and board.
           My mother joined the old Baptist Church soon after my fathers death. (baptized Nov 20, 1831 and excluded from the church January 18, 1840)  He was an infidel and would not allow his family to attend sectarian meetings.  He and Mr. Lavern once arranged a hogshead for a minister (Methodist) to stand on to preach and so fixed the hoops that a hard stamp would knock the head in and in the midst of his sermon he commenced stamping and at once dropped into the empty hogshead out of sight of his audience to the surprise of all but father and Mr. Lavern who were enjoying a hearty laugh at the expense of Acre Brown the preachers name.
           In 1833, one night my mother happened to be up in the night and said the stars were falling from heaven and she waked the older members of the family.  She was not excited but many of the citizens were upon their knees praying and thought the world was at an end.  About the year 1834 she married a Mr. Francis B. Collins, a nephew of Collins, the noted ax maker at Harpers Ferry, Virginia.  They moved to Kingsington, Philadelphia."

      She applied for Christopher's pension from service in the War of 1812, and received 246 acres in Powesheik, Jasper, Iowa. [3]

  • Sources 
    1. [S2244] Theda Laws or Irene Louise Potter, Personal Genealogical Research, Compiled.

    2. [S1535] Personal knowledge of Clark Timmins, [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE]\..

    3. [S2891] Personal knowledge of Marla Kirby, [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE]\..

    4. [S30] The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, International Genealogical Index(R)  (Copyright (c) 1980, 2002), downloaded 25 OCT 2007.

    5. [S2892] The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints [LDS]., "International Genealogical Index." Digital images.  ( FamilySearch . http://www.familysearch.org), (http://www.familysearch.org)..

    6. [S2897] Church Records  vol 111 9GS SER NO 5232 page 2249.


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